buttkrakoa

Uffish thoughts

389,021 notes

Convo between my 7year-old students today

Josie:
I have a new crusshhhhh
Matt:
Me too! On a boy!
Pearl:
You're a boy with a crush on a boy?
Matt:
Yeah he's really cute.
Pearl:
Oh.
(pause for a bit)
Matt:
Boys can like boys. I just can't marry him because boys can't marry boys.
Me:
Yeah they can. You can marry whoever you want.
Matt:
Really?
Josie:
YEAH my tia has a wife so now I have a titi and a auntie.
Matt:
Okay. Then maybe I'll marry him.
Dave:
(from across the room) No you can't you're seven.
(Age was apparently the only foreseeable problem anyone of my elementary schoolers could see with gay marriage.)

10,905 notes

cakeandrevolution:

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”
And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)
tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

Most linguistic pedantry is inherently racist in nature.

cakeandrevolution:

sadboosexual:

theyuniversity:

It’s good to know that we weren’t the only ones driven crazy by people who “axe” questions.

Okay, see, we talked about this linguisitic phenomenon in my grammar class. I don’t remember what it’s called, but it happens with other words, too - my professor used an example of “uncomfortable.” When you say it out loud, most likely, it sounds more like “un-comf-ter-ble,” thus mixing up the position of the r and the t, like how the k and the s are mixed in this speech pattern. However, not many people are out here acting high and mighty because someone said “uncomfterble” like they are with “ax,” and that has absolutely everything to do with academic biases - because “ax” is associated mostly with Black people (and occasionally lower-class whites), it’s viewed as “improper” speech, whereas most people, even middle & upper class white people who are thought to speak the most ~proper~ version of English, say “uncomfterble.”

And a quick Google search yields that even Chaucer used “axe” to mean “ask” within his writing. (Source) (Source)

tl;dr actually caring about whether someone says “ask” ~”correctly”~~ is rooted in racist & classist biases of language so, consider, not. 

Most linguistic pedantry is inherently racist in nature.

(via wolfbruh)